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Iowa Lakes References
Book Reference

Little Wall Lake, Hamilton County

LITTLE WALL LAKE
Mathangwane, B. T. (2001). Seasonal variation of lake water quality : influence of colloidal suspended solids and water chemistry in selected Iowa lakes.
This project focused on the chemistry of lake-water and lake-sediments with respect to their potential to carry inorganic and organic phosphate, ammoniacal nitrogen, as well as nutrient dispensability in lake-water, causing turbidity, due to seasonal fluctuations in lake-water chemistry. Lake-water and bottom-lake sediments were obtained from four Iowa lakes: Big Creek, Laverne, Little Wall and Saylorville. The selected lake-waters were expected to experience different types and sources of inputs due to differences in management of surrounding watersheds. Results showed changes in chemical composition of lake-water as seasons progressed from mid-summer to mid-fall and, that lake-eutrophication depended on lake-water chemistry, and epilimnetic TN:TP ratios as dictated by dispersion/flocculation processes. Mineral nitrogen was mostly in the NHb4 s'confined' form, and P0b4s-P was mostly in the inorganic form.
In order to shed additional light on the quantity-form and potential release or bioavailability of NHb4p+ sand P0b4s-P, quantity-intensity (Q/I) studies were carried out. Data suggested that in two of the lakes (Big Creek and Saylorville), a P-adsorption mechanism was operative, whereas the other two lakes (Laverne and Little Wall), some form of metal-phosphate was in effect. However, all four lakes showed that P would not be a limiting nutrient. Data further suggested that variation in suspended solids between lakes, which can be attributed to land management practices might influence water chemistry. The relatively high pH and phosphate presence along with the smectitic/humic coated clay minerals of Iowa and dissolved solids suggested high-suspended solids potential.

Hoyman, T. A. (1994). Wind-induced sediment resuspension in Little Wall Lake, Iowa.

Carper, G. L. (1983). Sediment resuspension in Little Wall Lake, Iowa.

 
Journal Reference

Little Wall Lake, Hamilton County

LITTLE WALL LAKE

Record 1 of 2 in Biological Abstracts 1992 Part 2
TI: FIFTY YEARS OF FISHERIES MANAGEMENT IN AN OBSTINATE PRAIRIE LAKE.
AU: SCARNECCHIA-D-L {a}; WAHL-J-R
SO: Journal-of-the-Iowa-Academy-of-Science. 1992; 99 (1): 7-14..
IS: 0896-8381
LA: ENGLISH
AB: Little Wall Lake, a shallow 104 ha glacial lake in Humilton Country, Iowa, has been manipulated for about 50 years by fishery managers in an attempt to provide a stable sport fishery. Managers have used dredging, water level manipulation, aquatic vegetation control, mechanical fish removal and fish eradication with toxicants, sport fish stocking, introduction of piscivorous fish, artificial habitat structures, and winter aeration. Attempts to stabilize the fishery have been unsuccessful, and because of overpopulation and stunting of panfishes, total fish eradications were conducted in 1977 and 1989. We review the history of management effort on the lake, and suggest a series of changes in the habitat and fish community designed to achieve the goal of stabilizing the sport fishery. Proposed management actions include more extensive dredging, more intensive water level manipulations, moderate vegetation control, restrictive harvest regulations on largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), and aggressive use and stocking of piscivorous fish (game and non-game species) to prevent overpopulation of panfishes.
AN: 199294038047

Record 2 of 2 in Biological Abstracts 1985-1986
TI: WIND RESUSPENSION OF SEDIMENTS IN A PRAIRIE LAKE.
AU: CARPER-G-L {a}; BACHMANN-R-W
SO: Canadian-Journal-of-Fisheries-and-Aquatic-Sciences. 1984; 41 (12): 1763-1767..
IS: 0706-652X
LA: ENGLISH
AB: Levels of inorganic suspended solids in Little Wall Lake, Iowa, were measured. Sediment resuspension occurred when wind velocities exceeded critical velocities as calculated from wave theory. The percentages of the lake bed subject to resuspension for winds of given velocities were calculated, as were the percentages of time that winds of such velocities could be expected. Only a small percentage of the lake bed is subject to resuspension most of the time. The techniques to calculate wind effects and to summarize the data on frequency of wind mixing used in this study should be generally applicable to problems of sediment resuspension in other shallow lakes.
AN: 198579075595

 





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