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Iowa Lakes References
Book Reference

Big Creek Lake, Polk County

BIG CREEK LAKE



Mathangwane, B. T. (2001). Seasonal variation of lake water quality : influence of colloidal suspended solids and water chemistry in selected Iowa lakes.

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Rock Island District. (1970). Saylorville Reservoir, Des Moines River, Iowa : Big Creek Valley remedial works : modifications to proposed terminal dam and spillway, and drainage of proposed diversion channel cut slopes to design memorandum. Rock Island, Ill., The District.

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Rock Island District. (1970). Saylorville Reservoir, Des Moines River, Iowa : Big Creek Valley remedial works : modifications to slopes of diversion and barrier dams to design memorandum. Rock Island, Ill., The District.

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Rock Island District. (1968). Saylorville Reservoir, Des Moines River, Iowa : Big Creek Valley remedial works : design memorandum. Rock Island, Ill., The District.

 
Journal Reference

Big Creek Lake, Polk County

BIG CREEK LAKE

Record 1 of 6 in Biological Abstracts 2000/07-2000/12
TI: Distribution and abundance of three freshwater mussel species (Bivalvia: Unionidae) correlated with physical habitat characteristics in an Iowa reservoir.
AU: Straka-J-R {a}; Downing-J-A
SO: Journal-of-the-Iowa-Academy-of-Science. [print] June, 2000; 107 (2): 25-33..
IS: 0896-8381
LA: English
AB: A rapid drawdown (<4 weeks) of a reservoir allowed us to determine the combined influence of water depth, maximum effective fetch, bottom slope, and substrate characteristics on abundance of three species of freshwater mussels. The three principal mussel species were significantly (P<0.001) correlated in different ways with characteristics of their physical habitat, implying separation of habitat requirements. Pyganodon grandis (Say) was most abundant on deeper shelves (ca. 3 m depth, slope <0.15 m/m, where fetch was great (>1 km), and sediment organic matter content was moderate (<3.5%). Lampsilis siliquoidea (Barnes), however, was most abundant in shallow water (<1.5 m), in flat, sheltered areas with low slope (<0.10 m/m) and fetch (<0.4 km), on substrates with 1-3% organic matter content. Potamilus alatus (Say) had a more cosmopolitan depth distribution, but was found only on bottoms with low slope (<0.01 m/m), where fetch was less than 0.8 km. The results of this study agree with previous studies with one important exception. Abundance of Pyganodon grandis was found to be negatively affected by increasing substrate organic matter content. This result stands in contrast to other studies that have suggested that abundance of Pyganodon grandis was positively correlated with substrate organic matter content.
AN: 200000307997

 





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